October 19, 2014 - Corporate Statutes, Policies, or Rules

stat·ute  (stcht) n.

1. A law enacted by a legislature.
2. A decree or edict, as of a ruler.
3.
 An established law or rule, as of a corporation.

[Middle English, from Old French estatut, from Late Latin stattum, from neuter of Latin stattus, past participleof statuereto set up, from status, position; see st- in Indo-European roots.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Looking at these three definitions as they may apply to Canada, the statutes here do not come from a "ruler" so that eliminates #2. Option #1 could apply if we have a legitimate legislature:

leg·is·la·ture  (lj-slchr) n.

An officially elected or otherwise selected body of people vested with the responsibility and power to make laws for a political unit, such as a state or nation.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Here we have a problem since we do not have a "political" unit. Canada is a "commercial" unit, a corporation with the appearance of elected leadership but not one in fact. That Canada is a corporation is evident in that it is "constituted" under its charter—the BNA Act of 1867 and by its existence on the US Securities and Exchange Commission.

con·sti·tute  (knst-tt, -tyt)

tr.v.  con·sti·tut·edcon·sti·tut·ingcon·sti·tutes

2. a. To set up or establish according to law or provision: a body that is duly constituted under the charter.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

incorporate verb

2. constitute (a company, city, or other organization) as a legal corporation. 

New Oxford American Dictionary 3rd edition © 2010, 2012 by Oxford University Press

So we are left with option #3 "An established law or rule, as of a corporation."

As a corporation the statutes it establishes can only apply to those in the employ of that corporation, i.e. an agent for the corporation or those performing a function in that corporation.

All corporations created by that corporation are in the employ of that corporation.

If that corporation is foreign owned, as is the case with Canada (Inc), then what possible jurisdiction do foreign statutes, policies, and rules have over the people who are not in the employ of that corporation?

Those employed to enforce the statutes, policies, and rules, i.e. police, have authority only over those who are also in the employ of these corporations.

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